Tragedy

Euripides: Helen

Helen (Greek: Ἑλένη) is a play by Euripides based on a variant legend in which the real Helen never reached Troy but was taken to Egypt by the God Hermes, where she is rescued by Menelaus.

Free online texts

Internet Archive: Euripides I. Iphigeneia at Aulis, Rhesus, Hecuba, The daughters of Troy, Helen. Bilingual Loeb edition, translated by Arthur Sanders Way. Multiple formats.

Internet Classics Archive: Helen, translated by E.P. Coleridge. HTML and TXT formats.

Loebulus: L009 - Euripides -- Euripides I: Iphigenia at Aulis. Rhesus. Hecuba. The Daughters of Troy. Helen. Greek and English parallel text. Loeb edition, PDF format.

Perseus: Greek text and English translation by E.P. Coleridge. HTML and XML formats.

Poetry in Translation: Helen, translated by George Theodoridis, Multiple formats.

University of Adelaide: Helen, translated by E.P. Coleridge. Multiple formats.

Wikisource:  Greek text and multiple English translations. HTML and other formats.

Other Resources

History of Ancient Greece: Euripides at War, podcast by Ryan Stitt.

Sententiae Antiquae: Paris Donned a Menelaos Disguise to Convince Helen to Go To Troy! 7 October 2016.

Wikipedia: Helen (play)

The Great Conversation: Further reading at Tom's Learning Notes

Homer: The Iliad.

Herodotus: The Histories - gives a version of the story that Helen never reached Troy, but took refuge in Egypt.

Thucydides: History of the Peloponnesian War - discounted Helen's role in the origins of the Trojan War.

Euripides: Iphigenia in Tauris- a play with a similar escape theme.

A.E. Haigh: The Tragic Drama of the Greeks (1896).

 Ancient Greek resources: Learn to read Greek classics in the original.

Bloom's Western Canon: Helen is listed.


Euripides: Ion

Ion (Greek: Ἴων) is a play by Euripides, probably composed around 412BC. The title character is the son of Apollo, by Creusa daughter of King Erechtheus of Athens. Abandoned at birth, his recognition by his mother in adulthood provided a theme that would influence the later New Comedy.

Free online texts

Gutenberg: Ίων, Greek text. Multiple formats.

Internet Archive: The Ion of Euripides. Greek text with English translation. by A.W. Verrall (1890). Multiple formats.

Internet Classics Archive: Ion, translated by Robert Potter. HTML and TXT formats.

Loebulus: L012 - Euripides -- Euripides IV: Ion. Hippolytus. Medea. Alcestis. Greek and English parallel text. Loeb edition, PDF format.

Perseus: Greek text and English translation by Robert Potter (1938). HTML and XML formats.

Poetry in Translation: Ion, translated by George Theodoridis. Multiple formats.

University of Adelaide: Ion, translated by Robert Potter. Multiple formats.

Wikisource: Greek text and multiple English translations. HTML and other formats.

Other Resources

Gutenberg: Euripides and His Age, by Gilbert Murray.

History of Ancient Greece: Euripides at War, podcast by Ryan Stitt.

Wikipedia: Ion (play)

The Great Conversation: Further reading at Tom's Learning Notes

A.E. Haigh: The Tragic Drama of the Greeks (1896).

 Ancient Greek resources: Learn to read Greek classics in the original.

Bloom's Western Canon: Ion is listed.


Euripides: Iphigenia in Tauris

 Iphigenia from Casa di Lucio Cecilio Giocondo, Pompeii. Picture by Marie-Lan Nguyen. Via Wikisource.Iphigenia in Tauris (Greek: Ἰφιγένεια ἐν Ταύροις) is a tragedy by Euripides probably first performed in Athens some time around 412 BC. The play's usual English title is, strictly speaking, the Latin name meaning 'Iphigenia among the Taurians'.

Euripides follows the version of the Iphigenia story in the Cypria, which relates that when her father Agamemnon was about to sacrifice her to secure the success of the Trojan expedition, she was spirited away by the goddess Artemis to be a priestess in the land of the Taurians in Crimea.

The play deals with the arrival of a group of Greeks among whom Iphigenia recognises her brother Orestes. She saves him from being sacrificed and they escape together with the image of the goddess. The theme of escape has led some commentators to conclude that like Euripides' similar Helen, it was composed after the defeat of the Sicilian Expedition in 413 BC.

Iphigenia in Tauris at Amazon: United States | Canada | United Kingdom | France | Germany | Spain | Italy

Free online texts

Gutenberg, Iphigenia in Tauris, translated by Gilbert Murray. Multiple formats.

Gutenberg: The Tragedies of Euripides, Vol I, translated by Theodore Alois Buckley (1892). Multiple formats. 

Internet Archive: Iphigenia in Tauris, verse translation by Witter Bynner. (1915). Multiple formats.

Internet Classics Archive: Iphigenia in Tauris, translated by Robert Potter. HTML and TXT formats.

Loebulus: L010N - Euripides -- Euripides II: Electra. Orestes. Iphigeneia in Taurica. Andromache. Cyclops. Greek and English parallel text. Loeb edition, PDF format.

Perseus: Iphigenia in Tauris, translated by Robert Potter. HTML and XML formats.

Poetry in Translation: Iphigenia in Tauris, translated by George Theodoris. Multiple formats.

University of Adelaide: Iphigenia in Tauris, translated by Robert Potter. Multiple formats.

Wikisource: Greek text and multiple English translations. HTML and other formats.

Other Resources

Gutenberg: Euripides and His Age, by Gilbert Murray.

History of Ancient Greece: Euripides at War, podcast by Ryan Stitt.

Librivox: Iphigenia in Tauris, public domain audiobooks.

Wikipedia: Iphigenia in Tauris

The Great Conversation: Further reading at Tom's Learning Notes

Homer: The Iliad

Epic Cycle: The Cypria.

Euripides: Iphigenia at Aulis

Euripides: Helen

Goethe: Iphigenia in Tauris.

A.E. Haigh: The Tragic Drama of the Greeks (1896).

 Ancient Greek resources: Learn to read Greek classics in the original.


Euripides: The Trojan Women

Ajax raping Cassandra from the Palladium. From Wikimedia Commons by User:Bibi Saint-Pol.The Trojan Women is a tragedy by Euripides, originally produced in Athens in 415 BC, the same year in which the Athenians captured the island of Melos, an event of often thought to have influenced the play's theme.

It centres on the fate of a series of captive women during the sack of Troy. Hecuba, the widow of Priam is to become a slave of Odysseus. Her daughter, the prophetess Cassandra, foresees her own death along with Agamemnon, who will take her as his concubine. Andromache, the widow of Hector, whose son is taken from her by the Greeks, is allotted to Neoptolemus. Helen, the mistress of Paris persuades her husband Menelaus to spare her and take her back.  In the finals scenes, the body of Andromache's son Astyanax is returned to Hecuba for burial, and the women are taken away as the city burns.


Euripides' The Trojan Women at Amazon: United States | Canada | United Kingdom | France | Germany | Spain | Italy
Free online texts

Gutenberg: The Trojan Women, translated by Gilbert Murray (1915). Multiple formats. 

Internet Archive: The Trojan Women of Euripides, translated by Gilbert Murray. Multiple formats.

Internet Classics Archive: The Trojan Women. HTML and TXT formats.

Loebulus: L009 - Euripides -- Euripides I: Iphigenia at Aulis. Rhesus. Hecuba. The Daughters of Troy. Helen. Greek and English parallel text. Loeb edition, PDF format.

Poetry in Translation: Trojan Women, translated by George Theodoridis. Multiple formats.

ToposText: English text indexed to accompanying map.

University of Adelaide: The Trojan Women, translated by E. P. Coleridge. Multiple formats.

Wikisource: Greek text and multiple English translations. HTML and XML formats.

Performances and Reviews

YaleNews: ‘The Trojan Women’ at Yale Summer Cabaret laments Syrian war, by Mike Cummings, 23 June 2017.

Gate Threatre, London

Guardian: Trojan Women Review, by Mchael Billington, 13 November 2012.

Amman

Financial Times: Syrian refugees stage Euripides’ ‘The Trojan Women’, by Charlotte Eagar, 3 January 2014.

Flea Theatre, New York

New York Times: The Trojan Women’ Laments War and Bloodshed, From a Distance, by Laura Collins-Hughes, 1 September 2016.

Other Resources

Binghamton University: Ancient Tragedy Study Guide - Euripides' Trojan Women, by Andrew Scholtz.

Gutenberg: Euripides and His Age, by Gilbert Murray.

History of Ancient Greece: Euripides at War, podcast by Ryan Stitt.

Internet Archive: Greek and Roman Plays - For the Intermediate Grades, by Dr Albert Cullum. Multiple formats.

Librivox: The Trojan Women. Public domain audiobooks, Coleridge and Murray translations.

University College London: Euripides' Trojan Women Study Guide, by Dr Rosa Andújar.

University College London:  Euripides, Trojan Women, by Professor Chris Carey.

University of Warwick: Summary - The Trojan Women by Euripides, by Mike Conley.

Wikipedia: The Trojan Women.

The Great Conversation: Further reading at Tom's Learning Notes

Homer: The Iliad.

Euripides: Hecuba.

Euripides: Andromache.

Thucydides: History of the Peloponnesian War. Recounts the sack of Melos which occurred around the time the play was first staged and may have influenced its theme.

Seneca: The Trojan Women - A Latin adaptation of the story.

A.E. Haigh: The Tragic Drama of the Greeks (1896).

Ancient Greek resources: Learn to read Greek classics in the original.


Euripides: Heracles

Mosaic of the madness of Heracles from the Villa Torre de Palma. Picture by Carole Raddato, via Wikimedia CommonsHeracles or the Madness of Heracles (Greek: Ἡρακλῆς μαινόμενος, Latin Hercules Furens) is a tragedy by Euripides which may have been produced in about 417 BC. 

The play opens with Heracles' wife and children at the altar of Zeus in Thebes, where they are threatened with death by the tyrant Lycus. Heracles returns from the underworld, where he had been engaged on the last of his twelve labours, and rescues them. However, the goddess Hera drives him mad and he kills his own family. When he recovers his senses, he is filled with despair. Consoled by Theseus, who had returned from Hades with him, he is taken to Athens to be purified.

Heracles at Amazon: United States | Canada | United Kingdom | France | Germany | Spain | Italy

Free online texts

Internet Archive: Euripides with an English translation by Arthur Sanders Way (1930). Vol. III. Bacchanals, The Madness of Hercules, The Children of Hercules, The Phoenician Maidens, Suppliants. Multiple formats

Internet Classics Archive: Heracles, translated by E.P Coleridge. HTML and TXT formats.

Loebulus: L011N - Euripides -- Euripides III: Bacchanals. Madness of Hercules. Children of Hercules. Phoenician Maidens. Suppliants. Greek and English parallel text. Loeb edition, PDF format.

Perseus: Heracles, translated by E. P. Coleridge. HTML and XML formats.

Poetry in Translation: Herakles, translated by George Theodoridis. Multiple formats.

University of Adelaide: Heracles, translated by E.P. Coleridge. Multiple formats.

Other Resources

History of Ancient Greece: Euripides at War, podcast by Ryan Stitt.

Wikipedia: Herakles (Euripides)

The Great Conversation: Further reading at Tom's Learning Notes

Euripides: Heracleidae.

Seneca: Hercules Furens - A Latin play telling the same story with some differences of plot.

A.E. Haigh: The Tragic Drama of the Greeks (1896).

 Ancient Greek resources: Learn to read Greek classics in the original.

Bloom's Western Canon: Heracles is listed.


Euripides: Electra

Orestes, Pylades and Elektra. Via Wikisource by user Bibi Saint-PolEuripides' Electra (Greek: Ἠλέκτρα) is sometimes thought to have been produced in around 413 BC, at the time of the Sicilian Expedition, but may be somewhat earlier.  The play gives Euripides' version of the story of the Argive princess Electra and her long-lost brother Orestes, and their murder of their mother Clytemnestra in revenge for the death of their father, Agamemnon.

This episode was also told in Sophocles' play of the same name and Aeschylus' The Libation Bearers. Euripides seems to satirize some elements of Aeschylus' version, notably with a recognition scene in which Electra rejects tokens of Orestes' identity that had been accepted in the older play.

Euripides' Electra at Amazon: United States | Canada | United Kingdom | France | Germany | Spain | Italy

Free online texts

Gutenberg: Electra, translated by Gilbert Murray (1905). Multiple formats. 

Gutenberg: Ηλέκτρα, Greek text. Multiple formats.

Internet Archive: Alcestis and Electra, translated by T.A. Buckley (1900). Multiple formats.

Internet Classics Archive: Electra, translated by E.P. Coleridge. HTML and TXT formats.

Loebulus: L010N - Euripides -- Euripides II: Electra. Orestes. Iphigeneia in Taurica. Andromache. Cyclops. Greek and English parallel text. Loeb edition, PDF format.

Perseus: Electra, translated by E. P. Coleridge. HTML and XML formats.

Poetry in Translation: Elektra, translated by George Theodoridis. Multiple formats.

University of Adelaide: Electra, translated by E.P. Coleridge.

Wikisource: Greek text and several translations in HTML and other formats.

Other Resources

Gutenberg: Euripides and His Age, by Gilbert Murray.

History of Ancient Greece: Euripides at War, podcast by Ryan Stitt.

Librivox: Electra, translated by Gilbert Murray. Public domain audiobook.

Wikipedia: Electra (Euripides play).

The Great Conversation: Further reading at Tom's Learning Notes

Aeschylus: The Libation Bearers - Part of the Oresteia trilogy which parallels the events of Euripides' Electra.

Sophocles: Electra.

A.E. Haigh: The Tragic Drama of the Greeks (1896).

 Ancient Greek resources: Learn to read Greek classics in the original.


Euripides: The Suppliants

Ruins of Eleusis by Carole Raddato, Wikimedia Commons.The Suppliants or The Suppliant Women (Greek: Ἱκέτιδες; Latin Supplices) is a tragedy by Euripides produced in around 422 BCE, a time when it's portrayal of an alliance between Athens and Argos would have been of some contemporary relevance.

The play opens immediately after the events recounted in Aeschylus' Seven Against Thebes. The Theban rulers have refused to allow the burial of the Argive leaders killed in the unsuccessful attack on their city. The mothers of the dead, accompanied by King Adrastus of Argos, travel to the shrine of Demeter at Eleusis in Attica. There they plead with Aethra, mother of King Theseus of Athens, for aid.

A Theban herald insolently demands the suppliants, in a debate which is notable for Theseus' defence of Athenian democracy as an institution. Theseus then forcibly recovers the bodies. Eviadne, widow of Capaneus, immolates herself on her husband's pyre during the subsequent funeral rites. The play ends with the sons of the Argives pledging to avenge their fathers and acknowledge their debt to Athens.

 The Suppliants at Amazon: United States | Canada | United Kingdom | France | Germany | Spain | Italy

Free online texts

Internet Archive: Euripides with an English translation by Arthur Sanders Way (1930). Vol. III. Bacchanals, The Madness of Hercules, The Children of Hercules, The Phoenician Maidens, Suppliants. Multiple formats.

Internet Classics Archive: The Suppliants, translated by E.P. Coleridge. HTML and TXT formats.

Loebulus: L011N - Euripides -- Euripides III: Bacchanals. Madness of Hercules. Children of Hercules. Phoenician Maidens. Suppliants. Greek and English parallel text. Loeb edition, PDF format.

Poetry in Translation: The Suppliant Women, translated by George Theodoridis. Multiple formats.

University of Adelaide: The Suppliants, translated by E.P. Coleridge. Multiple formats.

Wikisource: Suppliants (Euripides). Multiple translations. HTML and other formats.

Other Resources

Gutenberg: Euripides and His Age, by Gilbert Murray.

History of Ancient Greece: Euripides at War, podcast by Ryan Stitt.

Wikipedia: The Suppliants (Euripides).

The Great Conversation: Further reading at Tom's Learning Notes

Aeschlyus: The Seven Against Thebes

Herodotus: The Histories - references a version of the same story at 9.27.

A.E. Haigh: The Tragic Drama of the Greeks (1896).

 Ancient Greek resources: Learn to read Greek classics in the original.


Sophocles: Oedipus at Colonus

Oedipus at Colonus, Jean-Antoine-Théodore Giroust, 1788, Dallas Museum of ArtOedipus at Colonus (Greek: Οἰδίπους ἐπὶ Κολωνῷ, Oidipous epi Kolōnō, Latin: Oedipus Coloneus) is a tragedy by Sophocles, written shortly before his death in 406/405 BCE. It was produced at Athens by his grandson Sophocles the Younger in 401 BC.

It is thus the latest of the three 'Theban plays', in which Sophocles deals with the legends surrounding Oedipus and his family. Although the plays do not constitute a trilogy, it is tempting to see the portrayal of Oedipus' search for a place to die in peace, as the final reflection of the aging Sophocles on his earlier masterpiece Oedipus Rex.

The events at Colonus, a deme on the outskirts of Athens, are set some years after the earlier play. The protection afforded King Theseus allows Sophocles to portray Athens as a bastion of justice, where the exiled Oedipus is able to find some dignity. We nevertheless see a glimpse of old passions in his curse against his sons, setting up the events which had previously been portrayed by Aeschylus in the Seven Against Thebes, and by Sophocles himself in the Antigone.

Oedipus at Colonus at Amazon: United States | Canada | United Kingdom | France | Germany | Spain | Italy

Free online texts

Fadedpage.com: Oedipus at Colonus, translated by Gilbert Murray. Multiple formats.

Gutenberg: Plays of Sophocles: Oedipus the King; Oedipus at Colonus; Antigone; translated by Francis Storr.

Internet Archive: Oedipus at Colonus, Greek text edited by August Meineke (1863). Multiple formats.

Internet Archive: Sophocles - Oedipus Tyrannus, Oedipus at Colonus, Antigone, translated by John Swinnerton Phillimore (1902). Multiple formats.

Internet Classics Archive: Oedipus at Colonus, translated by F. Storr. HTML and TXT formats.

Loebulus. L020 - Sophocles -- Sophocles I: Oedipus the King. Oedipus at Colonus. Antigone. PDF of public domain Loeb edition in Greek and English.

Perseus: Greek text edited by Francis Storr (1912). English translation and notes by Richard Jebb (1889). HTML and XML formats.

Poetry in Translation: Oedipus at Colonus, translated by George Theodoridis. Multiple formats.

University of Adelaide: The Oedipus Trilogy (Oedipus the King - Oedipus at Colonus - Antigone), translated by F. Storr. Multiple formats.

Wikisource: Greek text and multiple English translations, including Plumptre (1878), Storr (1913) and Jebb (1917).

Performances and Reviews

British Theatre Guide: Oedipus at Colonus, Theatro Technis, reviewed by Howard Loxton.

The New Hampshire, Oedipus at Colonus, reviewed by Alex La Roza, 2 March 2017.

Nuvo: NoExit's Oedipus at Colonus at IMA, reviewed by Scott Shoger, May 2012.

 Other Resources

Ancient-literature.com: Oedipus at Colonus - synopsis and analysis.

Classical Wisdom: Oedipus at Colonus - the tale of two ancient deaths.

Grand Valley State University: Notes and questions for Oedipus at Colonus.

History of Ancient Greece: Sophocles, podcast by Ryan Stitt.

Librivox: Oedipus at Colonus, public domain audiobooks based on translations by Jebb and Storr.

Literature and History: The Requiem at Athens - Sophocles' Three Theban Plays, Part 2 - Oedipus at Colonus. Podcast and transcript by Doug Metzger.

QUATR.US Study Guides: Oedipus at Colonus, by Karen Carr.

Stockerblog: Oedipus at Colonus, by Barry Stocker.

Text Etc: Translating Sophocles 2 & 3, by C. John Holcombe.

Theatre Database: Oedipus at Colonus, essay excerpted from The Tragic Drama of the Greeks, by A.E. Haigh.

Wikipedia: Sophocles - Oedipus at Colonus.

The Great Conversation: Further reading at Tom's Learning Notes.

Sophocles: The other Theban plays - Oedipus the King and Antigone.

Aeschylus: Seven Against Thebes - tells the story of Oedipus' sons.

Aeschylus: Eumenides - shares a similar emphasis on Athens as the seat of justice.

Aristotle: The Poetics.

A.E. Haigh: The Tragic Drama of the Greeks (1896).

 Ancient Greek resources: Learn to read Greek classics in the original.

Bloom's Western Canon: Oedipus at Colonus is listed.


Euripides: Hecuba

Hecuba and Polyxena, by Merry-Joseph Blondel. Via Wikimedia Commons.Hecuba (Greek: Ἑκάβη) is a tragedy by Euripides thought to have been written around 424 BC. The plot examines the fate of Queen Hecuba of Troy after the city's fall to the Greeks.

Hecuba loses two of her surviving children in the early scenes of the play. Her daughter Polyxena is carried off by Odysseus to be sacrificed to the shade of Achilles. Her son Polydorus, who Hecuba believes is safely in hiding, is murdered by his guardian, King Polymestor of Thrace, in order to sieze Trojan treasure.

Hecuba learns the truth when Polydorus' body is washed up on the sea shore. Her appeals to Agamemnon for justice go unheard. Instead she lures Polymestor to her tent, where she enacts a bloody revenge, killing his sons, and leaving him blinded.

Hecuba at Amazon: United States | Canada | United Kingdom | France | Germany | Spain | Italy

Free online texts

Didaskalia: Hecuba, translated by Jay Kardan & Laura-Gray Street. PDF format.

Gutenberg: The Tragedies of Euripides, Vol I, translated by Theodore Alois Buckley (1892). Multiple formats. 

Internet Archive: Euripides' Hecuba, Greek text edited with notes Michael Tierney (1946). Multiple formats.

Internet Archive: L 484 Euripides II Children Of Heracles Hippolytus Andromache Hecuba. Loeb Edition, Greek and English parallel text. Multiple formats.

Internet Archive: Hecuba, Greek text edited by Charles Buller Heberden. Multiple formats.

Internet Archive: Hecuba, Greek text edited by W.S. Hadley (1894). Multiple formats.

Internet Archive: The Hecuba of Euripides, translated by John Bond (1882). Multiple formats.

Internet Archive: The Hecuba and Medea of Euripides, translated by W. Brownrigg Smith (1877). Multiple formats.

Internet Archive: The Hecuba of Euripides, translated by R. Mongan (1865). Multiple formats.

Internet Classics Archive: Hecuba, translated by E.P. Coleridge. HTML and TXT formats.

Internet Archive: The Hecuba of Euripides, Greek text with notes by T.K. Arnold (1852). Multiple formats.

Loebulus: L009 - Euripides -- Euripides I: Iphigenia at Aulis. Rhesus. Hecuba. The Daughters of Troy. Helen. Greek and English parallel text. Loeb edition, PDF format.

Perseus: Greek text and English translation by E.P. Coleridge. HTML and XML formats.

Poetry in Translation: Hekabe, translated by George Theodoridis. Multiple formats.

University of Adelaide: Hecuba, translated by E.P. Coleridge. Multiple formats.

Wikisource: Greek text and English translations. HTML and other formats.

Continue reading "Euripides: Hecuba" »


Euripides: Andromache

Captive Andromache, by Frederick Leighton. Wikimedia CommonsAndromache (Greek: Ἀνδρομάχη) is a tragedy by Euripides, thought to have been first performed in the early 420s BC. It is one of a number of Euripides' plays to elaborate the fates of women associated with the Trojan War.

Andromache, the widow of Hector, has been taken back to Greece as a concubine by Neoptolemus, the son of Achilles. Ten years after the war, she has borne him a son, while his wife Hermione, daughter of Menelaus, remains childless.

As the play opens, Andromache is seeking refuge from Hermione's jealousy at the shrine of Thetis. She turns back when her son Molossus is threatened with death, and seeks protection from Neoptolemus' grandfather Peleus. After a confrontation between Andromache and Hermione, Peleus intervenes to prevent Menelaus from killing Molossus. Hermione is unexpectedly carried off by her former suitor Orestes after Neoptolemus is murdered at Delphi, and the goddess Thetis appears as a deus ex machina to settle matters.

The negative portrayal of Menelaus in the play is often regarded as a manifestation of anti-Spartan feeling at Athens in the early years of the Peloponnesian War.

Andromache at Amazon: United States | Canada | United Kingdom | France | Germany | Spain | Italy

Free online texts

Gutenberg: Andromache, translated by Gilbert Murray (1900). Multiple formats.

Gutenberg: Ανδρομάχη. Greek text, multiple formats.

Internet Archive: Andromache. Greek text, edited by Gilbert Norwood (1906). Multiple formats.

Internet Archive: Andromache. Greek text, edited by A.R.F. Hyslop (1900). Multiple formats.

Internet Classics Archive: Andromache, translated by E.P. Coleridge. HTML and TXT formats.

Loebulus: L010N - Euripides -- Euripides II: Electra. Orestes. Iphigeneia in Taurica. Andromache. Cyclops. Greek and English parallel text. Loeb edition, PDF format. Also available as L484 at the Internet Archive.

Perseus: Greek text and English translation, by David Kovacs. HTML and XML formats.

Poetry in Translation: Andromache, translated by George Theodoridis. Multiple formats.

University of Adelaide: Andromache, translated by E.P. Coleridge.

Wikisource: Greek text and English translations. HTML and other formats.

Performances and Reviews

American Thymele Theatre, New York, 2014

Youtube: Andromache, American Theymele Theatre.

Other Resources

Ancient-literature.com: Andromache, synopsis and analysis.

Gutenberg: Euripides and His Age, by Gilbert Murray.

History of Ancient Greece: Euripides at War, podcast by Ryan Stitt.

Wikipedia: Andromache (play)

The Great Conversation: Further reading at Tom's Learning Notes

Homer: The Iliad.

Euripides: The Trojan Women, Helen, Iphigenia in Tauris, Iphigenia at Aulis.

A.E. Haigh: The Tragic Drama of the Greeks (1896).

 Ancient Greek resources: Learn to read Greek classics in the original.

Bloom's Western Canon: Andromache is listed.