Classical Literature

Virgil: The Eclogues

1024px-RomanVirgilFolio001rEcloguesThe Eclogues (Latin: Eclogae or Bucolica)  are a collection of ten pastoral poems by the Roman poet Virgil. Though modelled on the Greek Idylls of Theocritus, they are innovative in their use of the form for social commentary, contrasting the Arcadian ideal with the troubled society of late republican Rome.

Some of the rural conflicts portrayed may reflect Virgil's own possible eviction from his farm during the Civil Wars. Eclogue 4, which prophesied the birth of a child who would initiate a new era, may have been intended in praise of Octavian. During the Middle Ages, it was widely interpreted in Christian terms.

The Eclogues at online book stores
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Free online texts
Bilingual editions

Loebulus. L063N - Virgil -- Eclogues. Georgics. Aeneid, Books 1-6. PDF of public domain Loeb edition in Latin and English.
English translations
Gutenberg: The Bucolics and Eclogues. EPUB, HTML, MOBI and TXT formats.
Internet Archive: The Eclogues of Virgil, translated by Samuel Palmer. EPUB, MOBI, PDF and TXT formats.
Poetry in Translation: The Eclogues, translated by A.S. Kline (2001). Multiple formats.
University of Adelaide (Internet Archive): The Eclogues of Virgil, translated by J.B. Greenough. EPUB, MOBI and HTML formats.
Wikisource: Eclogues (Virgil). Multiple translations. HTML and other formats.
Latin texts
Gutenberg: The Bucolics and Eclogues. EPUB, HTML, MOBI and TXT formats. 
Wikisource: Eclogae vel Bucolica. HTML and other formats.

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Theognis: Elegies

Tanagra _5th_century_kylix_a_symposiast_sings_Theognis_o_paidon_kallisteThe Elegies (Greek: ἐλεγείων) are a body of short poems written some time in the sixth century BCE by Theognis of Megara, although some later poems are thought to have found their way into the collection. His authentic work is often seen as exemplary of the conservative values of the aristocratic symposia which emerged in response to the development of the Greek polis.

The Elegies at online book stores
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Free online texts
English translations

Perseus: The Elegiac Poems of Theognis, translated by J. M Edmonds. HTML and XML format.
Wikisource: Theognis of Megara, multiple external scans.
Greek texts
Perseus: ἐλεγείων. HTML and XML format.
Wikisource: Ελεγείαι Θεόγνιδος
Bilingual texts
Internet Archive: Elegy and Iambus, Vol I. Bilingual Loeb edition.

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Horace: Odes

345Horace_and_Lydia_by_Albert_Edelfelt_(1854-1905)The Odes (Latin: Carmina) are a collection of lyric poems by the Roman poet Quintus Horatius Flaccus (known in English as Horace). Modelled on the Greek odes of Sappho and Alcaeus, they address a range of public and private subjects, and reflect the reconcilitation of Horace, a republican soldier during the Civil War, with the regime of Augustus.

The first three books, published in 23 BCE, are dedicated to the emperor's literary adviser, Maecenas, who was introduced to Horace by Virgil. A fourth volume was added a decade later.

The Odes at online book stores
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Free online texts
Bilingual texts
Internet Archive: Odes and Epodes, translated by C.E Bennett. Loeb edition. EPUB, MOBI, PDF and TXT formats.
English translations

Gutenberg: The Odes and Carmen Saeculare. EPUB, HTML, MOBI and TXT formats.
Perseus: Odes, translated by John Conington. HTML and XML formats.
Poetry in Translation: The Odes, translated by A.S. Kline (2003). Multiple formats.
University of Adelaide (Internet Archive): The Works of Horace, translated into English Prose by C. Smart. EPUB, MOBI and HTML formats.
Wikisource: Odes, translated by Wikisource (incomplete). HTML and other formats.
Wikisource: The  Odes and Carmen Saeculare, translated by John Conington (incomplete). HTML and other formats.
Latin texts
Gutenberg: Odes and Epodes, edited by Gordon Jennings Laing and Paul Shorey. EPUB, HTML, MOBI and TXT formats.
Perseus: Carmina, HTML and XML formats.
Wikisource: Carmina. HTML and other formats.

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Pseudo-Longinus: On the Sublime

Zeus_Typhon_Staatliche_Antikensammlungen_596On the Sublime (Greek: Περì Ὕψους Perì Hýpsous) is a work on literary criticism written in Greek at some point during the Roman empire. The manuscript tradition attributes the work to 'Dionsysius or Longinus' and its true provenance has been the subject of much debate.

The concept of the sublime reflects the author's commendation of writing in a grand, elevated style, citing many examples from classical literature. The work is not mentioned by any other ancient writer, but became particularly influential during the eighteenth century.

On the Sublime at online book stores
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Free online texts
English translations
Attalus: On the Sublime, translated by W.H. Fyfe. HTML format.
Gutenberg: On the Sublime. EPUB, HTML, MOBI and TXT formats.
Internet Archive: On the Sublime, translated by H. L. Havell. EPUB, MOBI, PDF and TXT formats.
University of Adelaide (Internet Archive): On the Sublime, translated by W. Rhys Roberts. EPUB, MOBI and HTML formats.
Wikisource: On the Sublime, translated by H. L. Havell. HTML and other formats.
Greek texts
Internet Archive: Aristotle, The Poetics; "Longinus", On the Sublime; Demetrius, On Style. Bilingual Loeb edition. EPUB, MOBI, PDF and TXT formats.
Perseus: De Sublimitate. HTML and XML formats.

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Pindar: Odes

800px-Pindar_Musei_Capitolini_MC586The Odes (Greek: επινίκιες ωδές), in four books, are the only works of of the Archaic Greek poet Pindar c. 518 – 438 BC) to survive in complete form. Each book is named after one of the major panhellenic festivals, and collects poems dedicated to various victors at their associated games.

Widley admired for his elevated style, Pindar was considered one of the nine canonical lyric poets by Alexandrian scholars of the Hellenistic period.

The Odes at online book stores
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Free online texts
English translations
Gutenberg: The Extant Odes of Pindar, translated by Ernest Myers. EPUB, HTML, MOBI and TXT format.
Internet Archive: The Odes of Pindar, translated by Richmond Lattimore. EPUB, MOBI, PDF and TXT formats.
Perseus: Olympian, Pythian, Nemean and Isthmean Odes, translated by Diane Arnson Svarlien. HTML and XML formats.
Wikisource: Odes of Pindar. Multiple translations. HTML and other formats.
Greek texts
Loebulus: L056 - Pindar -- Odes of Pindar, including the Principal Fragments, translated by Sir John Sandys. Bilingual Loeb edition. PDF format.
Perseus: Olympian, Pythian, Nemean and Isthmean Odes. HTML and XML formats.
Wikisource: Πίνδαρος. HTML and other formats.

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Lucan: Pharsalia

La_mort_de_Pompée (anonymous via Wikisource)The Pharsalia or On the Civil War (Latin: De Bello Civili) is an epic by the Roman poet Lucan (39-65 CE) recounting the conflict between Julius Caesar and Pompey. It consists of ten books, of which the last appears to be incomplete, breaking off during Caesar's campaign in Egypt.

Lucan strongly favours the republican side and the poem has been seen as a riposte to the Augustan propaganda of Virgil's Aeneid. Lucan's stoicism is reflected in his portrayal of Cato, and in his avoidance of divine intervention as a plot device.

The Pharsalia at online book stores
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Free online texts

Bilingual editions

Loebulus. L220 - Lucan -- The Civil War (Pharsalia). PDF of public domain Loeb edition in Latin and English.

Perseus: Latin text and English translation by Edward Ridley (1896). HTML and XML formats.

English translations

Gutenberg: Pharsalia, Dramatic Episodes of the Civil Wars, edited by Douglas B. Killings (1996). HTML, EPUB, MOBI and TXT formats.

Internet Archive: The Pharsalia, translated by Henry T. Riley (1853). PDF, EPUB, TXT, and MOBI formats.

Medieval and Classical Literature Library: Pharsalia, translated by Edward Ridley (1896). HTML format.

Poetry in Translation: Pharsalia, translated by A.S. Kline (2014). Multiple formats.

University of Adelaide (Internet Archive): The Pharsalia of Lucan, translated by Edward Ridley (1896). Multiple formats.

University of Virginia: Lucan's Pharsalia, translated by Arthur Gorges (1614). HTML format.

Latin texts

Intratext: Bellum Civile. HTML format.

Latin Library: De Bello Civili sive Pharsalia. HTML format.

Wikisource: Pharsalia (Book 1). HTML and other formats.

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Seneca: Oedipus

IngresOdipusAndSphinxThe Oedipus of Seneca the Younger is a Latin adaptation of Sophocles' Oedipus Rex. As with many of Seneca's plays, the action is portrayed more directly than in the Greek model. Notably, in this instance, Jocasta's suicide takes place on stage, rather than being discovered after the fact as in Sophocles.

Oedipus at Amazon: United States | Canada | United Kingdom | France | Germany | Spain | Italy

Free online texts

Internet Archive: Tragedies I: Hercules Furens. Troades. Medea. Hippolytus. Oedipus. PDF of public domain Loeb edition in Latin with facing English translation by Frank Justus Miller.

Latin Library: Oedipus. Latin text. HTML format.

Loebulus: L062N - Tragedies I: Hercules Furens. Troades. Medea. Hippolytus. Oedipus. PDF of public domain Loeb edition in Latin and English.

Theoi: Oedipus, translated by Frank Justus Miller. HTML format.

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Seneca: Phaedra or Hippolytus

Alexandre_Cabanel_PhèdrePhaedra or Hippolytus by Seneca the Younger is a Latin adaptation of Euripides' Hippolytus. Both plays tell the story of Phaedra, the wife of King Theseus and her passion for her step-son Hippolytus. Seneca's portrays the action more directly than Euripides, relying less on intermediaries and letters at key plot points.

Phaedra at Amazon: United States | Canada | United Kingdom | France | Germany | Spain | Italy

Free online texts

Internet Archive: Tragedies I: Hercules Furens. Troades. Medea. Hippolytus. Oedipus. PDF of public domain Loeb edition in Latin with facing English translation by Frank Justus Miller.

Latin Library: Phaedra. Latin text. HTML format.

Loebulus. L062N - Tragedies I: Hercules Furens. Troades. Medea. Hippolytus. Oedipus. Public domain Loeb edition in Latin with facing English translation by Frank Justus Miller. Multiple formats.

Theoi: Phaedra, translated by Frank Justus Miller. HTML format.

Wikisource: Hippolytus or Phaedra, translated by Frank Justus Miller. HTML and other formats.

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Apuleius: The Golden Ass

Lucius_is_returned_to_human_form_at_the_procession_of_IsisThe Metamorphoses of Apuleius, better known as The Golden Ass (Latin: Asinus aureus) is the only complete surviving Latin novel from antiquity. In eleven books, it tells the story of Lucius, a Greek who is magically transformed into an ass, undergoing in that form a series of picaresque adventures.

The Golden Ass at Amazon: United States | Canada | United Kingdom | France | Germany | Spain | Italy

Free online texts

The English Server: The Golden Asse, English translation by William Adlington (1566). HTML format. Archived at the Internet Archive.

Forum Romanum: Metamorphoses. Latin text. HTML format. (Book I missing as of Dec 2018).

Gutenberg: The Golden Asse, English translation by William Adlington (1566). Multiple formats.

Internet Archive: The Golden Ass, Greek text and English translation by William Adlington, revised by  S. Gaselee (1924). Loeb edition. Multiple formats.

Loebulus: L044 - Apuleius - The Golden Ass. Greek text and English translation. PDF format.

Perseus: Metamorphoses. Latin text. HTML and XML formats.

Poetry in Translation: The Golden Ass, translated by A.S. Kline (2013). Multiple formats.

Sacred Texts Archive: The Golden Asse, English translation by William Adlington (1566). HTML format. See also The Marriage of Cupid and Psyche.

University of Adelaide (Internet Archive): The Golden Asse, English translation by William Adlington (1566). Multiple formats.

Wikisource: Latin text and English translation by William Adlington (1566). HTML and other formats.

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Petronius: Satyricon

Petronius at Home, by Piotr Stachiewicz (1858-1938)The Satyricon is a Latin satire in prose and verse attributed to one Petronius, conventionally identified with Petronius Arbiter, a prominent member of Nero's court who commited suicide in 65 AD.

Much of the work is lost with only parts of books 14, 15 and 16 surviving. It recounts the picaresque adventures of an amoral but cunning trio, comprising the narrator Encolpius, his friend Ascyltus, and the slave boy Giton. The most substantial extant episode is that of Trimalchio's dinner party (Latin: Cena Trimalchionis), a striking portrait of life among a rising class of nouveau-riche freedmen.

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Free online texts

Gutenberg: The Satyricon, translated by W.C. Firebaugh. Multiple formats. Shorter extracts also available at U Penn Online Books Page.

Gutenberg: The Satyricon of Petronius, translated by William Burnaby. Multiple formats.

Internet Archive: Petronius, Satyricon, translated by W.C. Firebaugh, Modified by Philip A. Harland, removing forged sections and modernizing some of the translations. Multiple formats.

Latin Library: Satiricon Liber. Latin text, HTML format.

Loebulus: L015 - Petronius - Satyricon. Apocolocyntosis. Greek-English bilingual Loeb edition. PDF format.

Perseus: Latin text and English translation, edited by Michael Heseltine (1913). HTML and XML formats.

Poetry in Translation: Satyricon, translated by A.S. Kline (2018). Multiple formats.

Pomona College: Satryricon, translated by A.R. Allinson (1930), modified and annotated by Christopher Chinn (2006). HTML format.

Sacred Texts Archive: The Satyricon, translated by Alfred R. Allinson. HTML format. Includes unmarked interpolations by Nodot.

Wikisource: Latin text and English translation, by W.C. Firebaugh. HTML and other formats.

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