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January 2021

Horace: Satires

Fedor_Bronnikov_014The Satires (Latin: Sermones) of Horace, are a series of poems written in the 30s BCE, collected in two books. They were Horace's first published work, and by the time the second volume appeared, he had been introduced by his friend Virgil into the literary circle around Augustus' advisor Maecenas.

Roman satire was an original Latin genre with no direct Greek precedent, and Horace's work represents the oldest fully extant example.

The Satires at online book stores
Amazon | bookshop.org (US) |bookshop.org (UK)

Free online texts
Bilingual texts
Loebulus: L194 - Horace - Satires. Epistles. Ars Poetica. Public domain Loeb edition. PDF format.
English translations
Gutenberg: The Satires, Epistles & Art of Poetry of Horace, translated by John Conington. EPUB, HTML, MOBI and TXT formats.
Internet Archive: The Satires of Horace in Rhythmic Prose, translated by R. M. Millington. EPUB, MOBI, PDF and TXT formats.
Perseus: The Works of Horace, translated into English Prose by C. Smart. HTML and XML formats.
Poetry in Translation: The Satires, Epistles and Ars Poetica, translated by A.S. Kline (2003-05). Multiple formats.
University of Adelaide (Internet Archive): The Works of Horace, translated into English Prose by C. Smart. EPUB, MOBI and HTML formats.
Wikisource: The Satires, Epistles & Art of Poetry of Horace, translated by John Conington. HTML and other formats.
Latin texts
Bibliotheca Augustana: Sermonum Libri II. HTML format.
Gutenberg: The Works of Horace. EPUB, HTML, MOBI and TXT formats.
Intratext: Sermones. HTML format.
Latin Library: Sermones. HTML format.
Perseus: Satyrarum Libri. HTML and XML formats.
Wikisource: Sermones. HTML and other formats.

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Virgil: The Eclogues

1024px-RomanVirgilFolio001rEcloguesThe Eclogues (Latin: Eclogae or Bucolica)  are a collection of ten pastoral poems by the Roman poet Virgil. Though modelled on the Greek Idylls of Theocritus, they are innovative in their use of the form for social commentary, contrasting the Arcadian ideal with the troubled society of late republican Rome.

Some of the rural conflicts portrayed may reflect Virgil's own possible eviction from his farm during the Civil Wars. Eclogue 4, which prophesied the birth of a child who would initiate a new era, may have been intended in praise of Octavian. During the Middle Ages, it was widely interpreted in Christian terms.

The Eclogues at online book stores
Amazon | bookshop.org (US) | bookshop.org (UK)

Free online texts
Bilingual editions

Loebulus. L063N - Virgil -- Eclogues. Georgics. Aeneid, Books 1-6. PDF of public domain Loeb edition in Latin and English.
English translations
Gutenberg: The Bucolics and Eclogues. EPUB, HTML, MOBI and TXT formats.
Internet Archive: The Eclogues of Virgil, translated by Samuel Palmer. EPUB, MOBI, PDF and TXT formats.
Poetry in Translation: The Eclogues, translated by A.S. Kline (2001). Multiple formats.
University of Adelaide (Internet Archive): The Eclogues of Virgil, translated by J.B. Greenough. EPUB, MOBI and HTML formats.
Wikisource: Eclogues (Virgil). Multiple translations. HTML and other formats.
Latin texts
Gutenberg: The Bucolics and Eclogues. EPUB, HTML, MOBI and TXT formats. 
Wikisource: Eclogae vel Bucolica. HTML and other formats.

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