Hegel: The Phenomenology of Mind
Charles Dickens: Oliver Twist

Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club

By R. Seymour, via Wikipedia.The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, or The Pickwick Papers, was the first novel by Charles Dickens, originally serialised from 1836 to 1837, when it was published in book form.

Commissioned to accompany humorous pictures of country life by illustrator Robert Seymour, it was an instant success, remembered for some of Dickens' best-loved characters, such as the cockney manservant Sam Weller. It is nevertheless remains unique in employing a broad comic vein to which Dickens never fully returned.

The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club at Online Stores
Amazon | Bookshop.org | Hive (UK independent bookshops)
Free online texts
Gutenberg: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club - Vol I | Vol II.  EPUB, HTML, MOBI and TXT formats.  
Internet Archive: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, autographed edition. EPUB, HTML, MOBI and PDF formats.
University of Adelaide (Internet Archive): The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club. EPUB, HTML and MOBI formats.
Wikisource: The Pickwick Papers. HTML and other formats.


Other Resources
Librivox: The Pickwick Papers. Public domain audiobooks.
Orwell Foundation: Charles Dickens, by George Orwell. A valuable critical essay.
Wikipedia: Charles Dickens - The Pickwick Papers
Further reading at Tom's Learning Notes
Don Quixote - seen as a model for the relationship between Mr Pickwick and Sam Weller.
Bloom's Western Canon: The Pickwick Papers is included.

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