Milton: Paradise Lost
Spenser: The Faerie Queene

Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales

Chaucer_ellesmereThe Canterbury Tales is a collection of 24 stories by Geoffrey Chaucer written between 1387 and 1400. The frame story of a pilgrimage from London to Canterbury allows Chaucer to depict a cross-section of late feudal society through the pen-portraits of the travellers in the General Prologue. 

The Tales may be incomplete, and although 30 pilgrims are introduced, only 24 tell a tale in the course of the narrative. Among the most famous is that of the Wife of Bath, whose implications for medieval views on women has long been debated.

The Canterbury Tales at Amazon: United States | Canada | United Kingdom | France | Germany | Spain | Italy

Free online texts

Gutenberg: The Canterbury Tales, edited by Walter Skeat. HTML, EPUB, Kindle and TXT formats.

Internet Archive:  The Canterbury Tales, edited by Walter Skeat (1893). Oxford World's Classics edition. EPUB, MOBI, TXT and PDF formats.

Internet Archive: The Canterbury Tales, edited and modernised by Arthur Burrell (1909). Everyman's Library edition. HTML, EPUB, Kindle and TXT formats.

Internet Archive: The Canterbury Tales, Coradella Collegiate Bookshelf Editions (2004). HTML, EPUB, Kindle and TXT formats.

University of Adelaide: The Canterbury Tales, edited by Walter Skeat. | The Canterbury Tales, edited and modernised by Arthur Burrell. HTML, EPUB, TXT and Kindle formats.

Wikisource: The Canterbury Tales. HTML and other formats.

Other Resources

BBC Radio 4 In Our Time: Chaucer. Melvyn Bragg with Carolyne Larrington, Helen Cooper, and Ardis Butterfield.

History of Philosophy Without Any Gaps: 292. Say it With Poetry - Chaucer and Langland. Podcast by Peter Adamson.

History of Philosophy Without Any Gaps: 294. Isabel Davis on Sexuality and Marriage in Chaucer. Interview podcast with Peter Adamson.

Internet Archive: A Reading from Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, by Jess B. Bessinger Jr.

Librivox: The Canterbury Tales - public domain audiobook in modernised English.

The Open Access Companion to the Canterbury Tales

Wikipedia: Geoffrey Chaucer - The Canterbury Tales.

The Great Conversation: Further reading at Tom's Learning Notes

Boethius: Consolations of Philosophy - mentioned in several tales.

Boccacio: The Decameron - A key influence on the frame story and many of the tales.

John Aubrey: Brief Lives- includes a life of Chaucer.

Harold Bloom's Western Canon: The Canterbury Tales is listed.

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