Berkeley: A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge
Kant: The Critique of Pure Reason

Berkeley: Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous

George_Berkeley._Line_engraving._Wellcome_V0000473Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous is a 1713 philosophical work by George Berkeley, written as a dialogue in which the characters discuss the metaphysical ideas which Berkeley had previously propounded to some criticism in A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge.

The two characters are given Greek names which reflect their respective commitments. Hylas is named after the Greek word for matter and takes a materialist position. Philonous, 'lover of mind', defends an idealist stance which is largely Berkeley's own.

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Free online texts

Early Modern Texts: Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous, adapted and translated into modern English, by Jonathan Bennett. PDF format.

Gutenberg: Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous. Multiple formats.

Internet Archive: Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous (1901). Multiple formats.

Wikisource: Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous. HTML and other formats.

Other Resources

BBC Radio 4 In Our Time: Bishop Berkeley. Peter Millican, Tom Stoneham and Michela Massimi.

Librivox: Three Dialogues Between Hylous and Philonous - Public domain audiobook. Also available at the Internet Archive.

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: George Berkeley.

Wikipedia: George Berkeley - Three Dialogues Between Hylous and Philonous.

Further reading at Tom's Learning Notes

Berkeley: A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge.

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