Aristophanes: The Birds
Aristophanes: Thesmophoriazusae

Aristophanes: Lysistrata

Lysistrata (Greek: Λυσιστράτη) is a comedy by Aristophanes, which may have been produced for the Lenaea Festival at Athens in 411 BC. It's theme reflects the city's misfortunes in the Peloponnesian War following the defeat of the Sicilian Expedition in 413 BC. The title character is an Athenian woman who contrives to force an end to the war, first by organising women from across Greece to refuse sexual relations with their menfolk, and secondly by leading Athenian wives in seizing the Acropolis, and fighting off the old men of the city.

Lysistrata at Amazon: United States | Canada | United Kingdom | France | Germany | Spain | Italy

Free online texts

Gutenberg: Greek text and English translation. Multiple formats.

Internet Archive: L 179 - Aristophanes III - Lysistrata, Thesmophoriazusae, Ecclesiazusae, Plutus. Bilingual Greek-English Loeb edition. 

Perseus: Greek text and English translation by Jack Lindsay. HTML and XML formats.

Poetry in Translation: Lysistrata, translated by George Theodoridis. Multiple formats.

University of Adelaide: Lysistrata. English translation, multiple formats.

Wikisource: Greek text and English translations. HTML and other formats.

Other Resources

History of Ancient Greece: o54- Old Comedy and Aristophanes. Podcast by Ryan Stitt.

Librivox: Lysistrata and Lysistrata (Version 2). Public domain audiobooks.

Literature and History: 36 - War and Peace and Sex - Aristophanes' Lysistrata, podcast by Doug Metzger.

Wikipedia: Lysistrata.

The Great Conversation: Further reading at Tom's Learning Notes

Aristophanes: Thesmophoriazusae, Ecclesiazusae - Two other plays which focus on Athenian women.

Ancient Greek resources: Learn to read Greek classics in the original.

Bloom's Western Canon: Lysistrata is listed.

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