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November 2016

Theophrastus: Enquiry Into Plants

The Enquiry into Plants (Greek: ,Περὶ φυτῶν ἱστορία)  by Theophrastus is the earliest major work on botany in the classical tradition. Theophrastus seems to have specialised in applying the methods of the peripatetic school in this area, while his teacher focused on animals.

The Enquiry Into Plants at Amazon: United States | Canada | United Kingdom | France | Germany | Spain | Italy

Free online texts

Loebulus. L070 - Theophrastus -- Enquiry into Plants I: Books 1-5. PDF of public domain Loeb edition in Greek and English. Also available via the Internet Archive.

Loebulus. L079 - Theophrastus -- Enquiry into Plants II: Books 6-9. Treatise on Odours. Concerning Weather Signs. PDF of public domain Loeb edition in Greek and English. Also available via the Internet Archive.

ToposText: Enquiry into Plants, translated by Arthur Fenton Hort (1916). HTML text with linked Google Maps.

Other Resources

History of Philosophy without any gaps: The Next Generation: the Followers of Plato and Aristotle - podcast by philosopher Peter Adamson.

Edward Worth Library: Theophrastus of Eresus.

Simon Fraser University: Theophrastus Project.

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosphy: Theophrastus, by Katerina Ierodiakonou

Wikipedia: Theophrastus - Historia Plantarum (Theophrastus).

The Great Conversation: Further reading at Tom's Learning Notes

Theophrastus: Characters

Aristotle: On the Soul (De Anima).

Aristotle: History of Animals.

Pliny: Natural History.

 Ancient Greek resources: Learn to read Greek classics in the original.


Theophrastus: On Characters

The Characters (Ἠθικοὶ χαρακτῆρες), attributed to Theophrastus, is a collection of character sketches each illustrating some vice, often a vice of excess or deficiency, in line with Aristotle's doctrine of the mean, which suggests that virtue is a middle way between extremes. The work provides a valuable insight into the manners of late classical Athens. It has been suggested that the Characters was an influence on Theophrastus' pupil, the comic playwright Menander.

The Characters at Amazon: United States | Canada | United Kingdom | France | Germany | Spain | Italy

Free online texts

An Eudaemonist: The Characters of Theophrastus, translated by R.C Jebb (1870). HTML format.

Loebulus. L225N - Theophrastus -- Characters of Theophrastus. PDF of public domain Loeb edition in Greek and English.

Μικρός Απόπλους: ΧΑΡΑΚΤΗΡΕΣ, Greek text. HTML format.

Perseus: Greek text, edited by H. Diels (Oxford, 1909).

Other Resources

History of Philosophy without any gaps: The Next Generation: the Followers of Plato and Aristotle - podcast by philosopher Peter Adamson.

Simon Fraser University: Theophrastus Project.

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: Theophrastus, by Katerina Ierodiakonou

Wikipedia: Theophrastus

The Great Conversation: Further reading at Tom's Learning Notes

Aristotle: Nicomachean Ethics.

Aristotle (attributed): On Virtues and Vices.

Aristotle: The Poetics.

Menander: Dyskolos.

 Ancient Greek resources: Learn to read Greek classics in the original.


Aristotle (attributed): On Virtues and Vices

On Virtues and Vices (Greek: Περὶ Ἀρετῶν καὶ Κακιῶν; Latin: De Virtutibus et Vitiis Libellus) is a short ethical treatise once thought to be by Aristotle, but now more usually thought to be the work of a later follower.

On Virtues and Vices at Amazon: United States | Canada | United Kingdom | France 

Free online  texts

Internet Archive: The Works of Aristotle - Magna Moralia, Ethica Eudemia, De Virtutibus Et Vitiis. English translations, edited by W.D. Ross. Multiple formats.

Loebulus. L285 - Aristotle -- Athenian Constitution. Eudemian Ethics. Virtues and Vices. PDF of public domain Loeb edition in Greek and English.

Perseus: Greek text (ed. Bekker, 1831). English text, translated by H. Rackham. HTML and XML formats.

Wikisource: Περί Αρετών και Κακιών - Greek text. Multiple formats.

Other Resources

Wikipedia: On Virtues and Vices.

The Great Conversation: Further reading at Tom's Learning Notes

Aristotle: The Nicomachean Ethics.

Aristotle: The Eudemian Ethics.

Aristotle (attributed): The Magna Moralia.

Theophrastus: The Characters.

 Ancient Greek resources: Learn to read Greek classics in the original.


Aristotle: The Athenian Constitution

The Athenian Constitution (Greek: Αθηναίων Πολιτεία) is thought to be the only text by Aristotle rediscovered in modern times, based on papyri recovered in the Nineteenth Century. It may be the last remnant of a project Aristotle is said to have initiated to collect the constitutions of all the Greek states.

The work should not be confused with another of the same title, once thought to be by Xenophon, but now generally attributed to an anonymous 'Old Oligarch'.

The Athenian Constitution at Amazon: United States | Canada | United Kingdom | France | Germany | Spain | Italy

Free online texts

Gutenberg: The Athenian Constitution, translated by Frederic G. Kenyon. Multiple formats.

Gutenberg: Αθηναίων Πολιτεία by Aristotle. Greek text. Multiple formats.

Internet Archive: The Works of Aristotle Vol X: Politica, Oeconomica, Atheniensum Respublica, the latter translated by Frederic G. Kenyon. Multiple formats.

Internet Classics Archive: The Athenian Constitution, translated by Frederic G. Kenyon. HTML and TXT formats.

Internet History Sourcebook: The Athenian Constitution, translated by Frederic G. Kenyon. TXT format.

Loebulus. L285 - Aristotle -- Athenian Constitution. Eudemian Ethics. Virtues and Vices. PDF of public domain Loeb edition in Greek and English.

Perseus: Greek text, edited y Frederic G. Kenyon. English text, translated by H. Rackham. HTML and XML formats.

University of Adelaide: The Athenian Constitution, translated by Frederic G. Kenyon. Multiple formats.

Wikisource: The Athenian Constitution, translated by Frederic G. Kenyon. Multiple formats.

Other Resources

Librivox: The Constitution of Athens - public domain audiobook.

Wikipedia: Constitution of the Athenians.

The Great Conversation: Further reading at Tom's Learning Notes

Plato: The Republic, The Laws.

Aristotle: The Politics

Xenophon: The Spartan Constitution.

Ancient Greek resources: Learn to read Greek classics in the original.


Aristotle (attributed): The Economics

The Economics (Greek: Οἰκονομικά; Latin: Oeconomica) is a work attributed to Aristotle, although now more often thought to be by one of his followers. Its subject matter of household management reflects the origin of modern term economics in the Greek word for the household, oikos.

The Economics at Amazon: United States | Canada | United Kingdom | France | Germany | Spain | Italy

Free online texts

Internet Archive: The Oeconomica, translated by E.S. Forster (1920). Multiple formats.

Perseus: Greek text (Harvard, 1935). English text, translated by G.C. Armstrong (Harvard 1935).

Wikisource: Οικονομικά (Αριστοτέλης), Greek text.

Other Resources

Librivox: Economics - public domain audiobook.

Wikipedia: Economics (Aristotle).

The Great Conversation: Further reading at Tom's Learning Notes

Aristotle: The Politics.

Xenophon: Oeconomicus.

 Ancient Greek resources: Learn to read Greek classics in the original.


Jordanes: Getica

The Getica otherwise known as the The Origin and Deeds of the Goths (Latin: De Origine Actibusque Getarum) is a mid-sixth century Latin work by Jordanes, apparently intended as a summary of a lost work on the Goths by Cassiodorus.

The Getica at Amazon: United States | Canada | United Kingdom | France | Germany | Spain | Italy

Free online texts

Gutenberg: The Origin and Deeds of the Goths, trans. Charles C. Mierow. multiple formats.

Internet Archive: The Gothic History of Jordanes, translated by Charles Mierow (1915). Multiple formats.

The Latin Library: Iordanis De Origine Actibusque Getarum. Latin text, HTML format.

Northvegr: The Origin and Deeds of the Goths, trans. Charles C. Mierow. HTML format.

University of Calgary: The Origin and Deeds of the Goths, trans. Charles C. Mierow. HTML format.

Wikisource: The Origin and Deeds of the Goths, trans. Charles C. Mierow. HTML format.

Other Resources

Georgetown University: The Aims of Jordanes, by James J. O'Donnell, Historia, 31(1982) 223-240.

Wikipedia: Getica.

The Great Conversation: Further reading at Tom's Learning Notes

Tacitus: Germania - The first major account of the Germanic peoples.

Orosius: Seven Books of History Against the Pagans - used as a source by Jordanes.

The Getica at Amazon: United States | Canada | United Kingdom | France | Germany | Spain | Italy


Nennius: Historia Brittonum

The Historia Brittonum, or History of the Britons, traditionally ascribed to Nennius, was probably written in the early ninth century. Its account of events in early Britain provided much of material for later Arthurian legend.

Historia Brittonum at Amazon: United States | Canada | United Kingdom | France | Germany | Spain | Italy

Free online texts

Gutenberg: History of the Britons, multiple formats. 

Internet Archive: Six old English chronicles. Ethelwerd's Chronicle. Asser's Life of Alfred. Geoffrey of Monmouth's British history. Gildas. Nennius. And Richard of Cirencester, translated by J. A. Giles. Multiple formats.

Wikisource: Historia Brittonum, Latin text. History of the Britons, English text, translated by W. Gunn & J. A. Giles. HTML format.

Yale Law School Avalon Project: History Of The Britons, translated by J. A. Giles.

Other Resources

Internet Archive: Nennius vindicatus. Über entstehung, geschichte und quellen der Historia Brittonum, by Heinrich Zimmer (1893). German language commentary.

Librivox: History of the Britons - public domain audiobook.

Wikipedia: Nennius - Historia Brittonum.

The Great Conversation: Further reading at Tom's Learning Notes

Gildas: On the Ruin and Conquest of Britain.

Bede: The Ecclesiastical History of the English People.


Isidore of Seville: Etymologies

The Etymologies (Latin: Etymologiae) or Origines is an encyclopedia compiled by St Isidore of Seville in the early seventh century. It was a major source for the transmission of classical learning to the Middle Ages, partly because of its relatively simple Latin. Modern students of Latin may find it worth dipping into for the same reason.

The Etymologies at Amazon: United States | Canada | United Kingdom | France | Germany | Spain | Italy

Free online texts

Internet Archive: Isidori Hispalensis episcopi Etymologiarum sive Originvm libri XX, Volume 1. Latin text, multiple formats.

Intratext: Etymologiarum sive originum libri XX, edited by W. M. Lindsay (Oxford, 1911). Latin text, HTML format.

LacusCurtius: The Etymologies (or Origins) - Latin text, html format.

The Latin Library: Etymologiarum sive Originum Libri XX - Latin text, html format.

Wikisource: Etymologiarum libri XX - Latin text.

Other Resources

Bestiary.ca: An Encyclopedist of the Dark Ages - Isidore of Seville, by Ernest Brehaut, Studies in History, Economics and Public Law, Columbia University, 1912. PDF format.

British Library: Medieval Manuscripts Blog - Isidore of Seville's Etymologies: Who's Your Daddy?

Wikipedia: Etymologiae.

The Great Conversation: Further reading at Tom's Learning Notes

Sources

Pliny: Natural History.

Orosius: Seven Books of History Against the Pagans.

Latin Resources: Online materials for learning Latin.


Aristotle (attributed): The Magna Moralia

The Magna Moralia or Great Ethics is a treatise traditionally attributed to Aristotle, but now more often thought to be by a later writer in the Aristotelian tradition.

The Magna Moralia at Amazon: United States | Canada | United Kingdom | France | Germany | Spain | Italy

Free online texts

Internet Archive: The Works of Aristotle - Magna Moralia, Ethica Eudemia, De Virtutibus Et Vitiis. English translations, edited by W.D. Ross (1915). Multiple formats.

Wikisource: Ηθικά Μεγάλα, Greek text.

Other Resources

Librivox: Magna Moralia, public domain audiobook.

Wikipedia: Magna Moralia.

The Great Conversation: Further reading at Tom's Learning Notes

Aristotle: Nicomachean Ethics.

Aristotle: Eudemian Ethics.

Ancient Greek resources: Learn to read Greek classics in the original.


Aristotle: Parva Naturalia

The Parva Naturalia or short treatises on nature are a collection of seven works by Aristotle. In the Bekker numbering of the Aristotelian corpus they follow On the Soul, and each concerns problems which touch on the relationship between body and soul.

The seven works are:

The Parva Naturalia at Amazon: United States | Canada | United Kingdom | France | Germany | Spain | Italy

Free online  texts

Internet Archive: The Works of Aristotle, Vol III, translated under the editorship of W.D. Ross (1910). Parva Naturalia translated by J.I. Beare and G.R.T. Ross. Multiple formats.

Internet Archive: Aristotle's Psychology: A Treatise on the Principle of Life (De Anima and Parva Naturalia), translated by W.A. Hammond (1902). Multiple formats.

Other Resources

History of Philosophy without any gaps: Classified Information: Aristotle's Biology - podcast by philosopher Peter Adamson.

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: Aristotle's Biology, by James Lennox.

 The Great Conversation: Further reading at Tom's Learning Notes

Aristotle: On the Soul