The Dramatic Date of Plato's Dialogues
Aristotle: On Interpretation

Homer: The Odyssey

The Odyssey is an ancient Greek epic poem following the wanderings of Odysseus on his return from the Trojan War. As such, it is a sequel to the Iliad, although its exact relationship to the earlier poem is as controversial as the historical existence of Homer, the traditional author of both epics. As with the Iliad, the story opens 'in the middle of things' with Odysseus held captive by the goddess Calypso. His adventures in the ten years since the fall of Troy are recounted as the story advances towards his final homecoming.

Free online texts

Gutenberg: The Odyssey, translated by Alexander Pople. Multiple formats.

Gutenberg: The Odyssey, done into English prose, translated by Samuel Henry Butcher and Andrew Lang. Multiple formats.

Gutenberg: The Odyssey, Rendered into English prose for the use of those who cannot read the original, translated by Samuel Butler. Multiple formats.

Loebulus. L104 - Homer - Odyssey I: Books 1-12. PDF of public domain Loeb edition in Greek and English.

Loebulus. L105 - Homer -- Odyssey II: Books 13-24. PDF of public domain Loeb edition in Greek and English.

Perseus: Greek text (Loeb edition, 1919). English translation (Butler, 1900), revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy. English translation (A.T. Murray, loeb edition, 1919).  Online texts.

Poetry in Translation: The Odyssey, translated by A.S. Kline (2004). Multiple formats.

Theoi.com:  The Odyssey. Translated by Murray, A T. Loeb Classical Library Volumes. Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1919.

Wikisource: Οδύσσεια - Greek text. English translations by Alexander Pope (1725), William Cowper (1791), Samuel Butler (1898). HTML and other formats.

Other Resources

Bartleby: The Adventures of Odysseus and the Tale of Troy, retold by Padraic Colum (Macmillan, 1918). HTML text.

The Conversation: Guide to the Classics - Homer's Odyssey, by Professor Chris Mackie.

Greek Myth Comix: Odyssey Comix, by Laura Jenkinson.

Gutenberg: Homer's Odyssey: A Commentary, by Jacques Denton Snider.

In Our Time: The Odyssey - BBC radio discussion with Melvyn Bragg.

Librivox: The Odyssey - public domain audiobooks.

Literature and History: Podcasts and transcripts. Kleos and Nostos - Homer's Odyssey, Books 1-8 | His Mind Teeming - The Odyssey, Books 9-16 | The Autumn Leaves - The Odyssey, Books 17-24. 

Memrise: Odyssey Greek vocabulary lists by leodavidson22, ozza_hozza.

TedEd: The science behind the myth: Homer's "Odyssey" - video by Matt Kaplan 

VoxHistorically, men translated the Odyssey. Here’s what happened when a woman took the job, by Anna North, 20 Nov 2017.

Wikipedia: The Odyssey - Odyssean gods.

Youtube: A Long and Difficult Journey, or The Odyssey - video from the CrashCourse channel. 

The Great Conversation: Further reading at Tom's Learning Notes

Ancient Greek resources: Learn to read Greek classics in the original.

Homer: The Iliad.

Aeschylus: The Oresteia - focuses on the return home or nostos of Agamemnon, as the Odyssey recounts the return of Odysseus.

Sophocles: Ajax - Philoctetes - two plays with Odysseus as a central character.

Euripides: Cyclops - dramatises one of the most famous episodes from the Odyssey.

Virgil: The Aeneid - A Roman epic which draws on Homeric myth and takes the Odyssey as the model for Aeneas' wanderings.

Bloom's Western Canon - The Odyssey is listed.

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