Xenophon: Symposium
Julius Caesar: Commentaries on the Gallic War

Xenophon: Hiero

Hiero (Greek: Ἱέρων, Hiéron) is a dialogue by Xenophon, in which the principal characters are Hieron I, tyrant of Syracuse, and the poet Simonides.  Hieron explains the dangers of a tyrant's position compared to that of a private citizen, while Simonides argues that a tyrant can achieve happiness by ruling well.

The dialogue was the subject of a significant debate between the twentieth century philosophers Leo Strauss and Alexandre Kojeve. 

Hiero at online book stores
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Free Online Texts

Gutenberg: Hiero, English translation by H.G. Dakyns. Multiple formats.

Loebulus. L183 - Xenophon -- Scripta Minora: Hiero. Agesilaus. Constitution of the Lacedaemonians. Ways and Means. Cavalry Commander. Art of Horsemanship. On Hunting. Constitution of the Athenians. PDF of public domain Loeb edition in Greek and English.

Perseus: Greek text, (Clarendon, 1920). English text, translated by E.C. Marchant and H.G. Bowersock (Heinemann, 1925). HTML and TXT formats.

University of Adelaide (Internet Archive): Hiero, English translation by H.G. Dakyns. Multiple formats.

Wikisource: Hiero, English translation by H.G. Dakyns. Downloads via Book Creator.

Other resources

BBC Radio 4 In Our Time: Xenophon. Melvyn Bragg with Paul Cartledge, Edith Hall and Simon Goldhill.

Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy: Xenophon, by Eve A. Browning.

Internet Archive: Restatement on Xenophon's Hiero, by Leo Strauss.

Wikipedia: Hiero (Xenophon).

The Great Conversation: Further Reading at Tom's Learning Notes

Xenophon: Cyropaedia.

Machiavelli: The Prince.

Ancient Greek resources: Learn to read Greek classics in the original.

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