Plutarch: Parallel Lives
Procopius: The Wars of Justinian

Xenophon: Cyropaedia

The Cyropaedia (Greek: Κύρου παιδεία 'The Education of Cyrus') is a work by Xenophon, which presents an account of the education of the Persian king Cyrus the Great, in order to address the question of why people obey some rulers and not others.

Although Xenophon had some experience of the Persian Empire as a result of the expedition chronicled in the Anabasis, it is not clear how far his picture of Cyrus is intended as historical. As an idealized vision of the proper education of a ruler, the work had a formative influence on the literary genre known as 'mirrors for princes'.

Xenophon's Cyropaedia at Amazon: United States | Canada | United Kingdom | France | Germany | Spain | Italy

Free online texts

Cyrus' Paradise: The World's first online commentary on an ancient text. Greek text with crowdsourced English commentary.

Loebulus. L051 - Xenophon -- Cyropaedia I: Books 1-4. PDF of public domain Loeb edition in Greek and English. Also at the Internet Archive.

Loebulus. L052 - Xenophon -- Cyropaedia II: Books 5-8. PDF of public domain Loeb edition in Greek and English. Also at the Internet Archive.

Gutenberg: Cyropaedia - The Education of Cyrus, translated by H.G. Dakyns. Multiple formats.

Perseus: Greek text (Oxford, 1910). English text, translated by Walter Miller (1914). HTML and XML formats.

Wikisource: Κύρου Παιδεία, Greek text. Multiple formats.

Other Resources

BBC News: Cyrus Cylinder: How a Persian monarch inspired Jefferson.

BBC Radio 4 In Our Time: Xenophon. Melvyn Bragg with Paul Cartledge, Edith Hall and Simon Goldhill.

Encyclopaedia Iranica: Cyropaedia.

Leo Strauss Center: Xenophon, Winter 1963 - lecture series.

Librivox: Cyropaedia: Public domain audiobook.

Wikipedia: Cyropedia.

The Great Conversation: Further reading at Tom's Learning Notes

Xenophon: Hiero, Agesilaus, Constitution of the Spartans, Anabasis, Hellenica.

Herodotus: The Histories.

Plato: The Laws.

Machiavelli: The Prince.

Ancient Greek resources: Learn to read Greek classics in the original.

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