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May 2018

Euripides: Cyclops

Cyclops (Greek: Κύκλωψ) is a play by Euripides, probably first produced around 412 BC. It is the only fuly surviving example of a satyr drama, the plays which traditionally provided a comic coda to the tragic trilogies submitted in dramatic competitions at Athenian festivals. Its subject matter is taken from the encounter with Polyphemus in the Odyssey.

Free online texts

Gutenberg: Κύκλωψ, Greek text. Multiple formats.

Internet Archive: The Cyclops, English verse translation by Percy Bysshe Shelley. Multiple formats.

Internet Classics Archive: The Cyclops, translated by E.P Coleridge. HTML and TXT formats.

Loebulus: L010N - Euripides -- Euripides II: Electra. Orestes. Iphigeneia in Taurica. Andromache. Cyclops. Greek and English parallel text. Loeb edition, PDF format.

Perseus: Greek text and English translation by David Kovacs. HTML and XML formats.

Poetry in Translation: Cyclops, translated by George Theodoridis. Multiple formats.

University of Adelaide: The Cyclops, translated by E.P. Coleridge. Multiple formats.

Wikisource: Greek text and English translation by Shelley. HTML and other formats.

Other Resources

Gutenberg: Euripides and His Age, by Gilbert Murray.

History of Ancient Greece: Early Euripides, podcast by Ryan Stitt.

Wikipedia: Cyclops (play).

The Great Conversation: Further reading at Tom's Learning Notes

Homer: The Odyssey.

A.E. Haigh: The Tragic Drama of the Greeks (1896).

 Ancient Greek resources: Learn to read Greek classics in the original.

Bloom's Western Canon: Cyclops is listed.


Euripides: Iphigenia at Aulis

The Anger of Achilles, by Jacques-Louis David. Image by Wikimedia Commons user GuyStairSaintyIphigenia in Aulis or at Aulis (Greek: Ἰφιγένεια ἐν Αὐλίδι) is a tragedy by Euripides, probably first produced at Athens after his death in 405 BC. It dramatises the story of the sacrifice of Iphigenia by her father Agamemnon, in order to ensure the success of the Trojan Expedition.

The play is notable for the emphasis on the characters at the expense of the chorus.

Free online texts

Gutenberg: Ιφιγένεια εν Αυλίδι, Greek text. Multiple formats.

Gutenberg: The Tragedies of Euripides, Vol I, translated by Theodore Alois Buckley (1892). Multiple formats. 

Internet Archive: The Iphigenia at Aulis of Euripides. Greek text with English notes by Edwin Bourdieu England (1891). Multiple formats.

Internet Archive: Iphigenia at Aulis. Edition of earliest English translation by Jane Fitzalan Lumley (1577). Multiple formats.

Internet Classics Archive: Iphigenia at Aulis. HTML and TXT formats.

Loebulus: L009 - Euripides -- Euripides I: Iphigenia at Aulis. Rhesus. Hecuba. The Daughters of Troy. Helen. Greek and English parallel text. Loeb edition, PDF format.

Perseus: Greek text and English translation by E.P. Coleridge. HTML and XML formats.

Poetry in Translation: Iphigenia at Aulis, translated by George Theodoridis. Multiple formats.

University of Adelaide: Iphigenia at Aulis, translated by E.P. Coleridge. Multiple formats.

Wikisource: Iphigenia at Aulis, English translation by T.A. Buckley. HTML and other formats.

Other Resources

Gutenberg: Euripides and His Age, by Gilbert Murray.

History of Ancient Greece: Euripides at War, podcast by Ryan Stitt.

Librivox: Iphigenia in Aulis. Public domain audiobooks.

Wikipedia: Iphigenia in Aulis.

The Great Conversation: Further reading at Tom's Learning Notes

Euripides: Iphigenia in Tauris.

Euripides: The Bacchae.

A.E. Haigh: The Tragic Drama of the Greeks (1896).

 Ancient Greek resources: Learn to read Greek classics in the original.

Bloom's Western Canon: Iphigenia at Aulis is listed.


Euripides: The Bacchae

Pentheus being torn by maenads. Casa dei Vettii. Via Wikimedia Commons.The Bacchae (Greek: Βάκχαι) is a tragedy by Euripides, found at his death in 406 BC, and produced in 406 BC. The play dramatises the introduction into Greece of the worship of the god Dionysus. Visiting Thebes, he is rejected by king Pentheus, and takes his revenge by driving the women of the city into a frenzy of madness. Among them, is Pentheus' mother Agave, who tears her son to pieces before recovering her senses and realizing what she has done. The play ends with their family being banished from the city.

Free online texts

Gutenberg: The Bacchae, translated by Gilbert Murray (1906). Multiple formats.

Gutenberg: The Tragedies of Euripides, Vol I, translated by Theodore Alois Buckley (1892). Multiple formats. 

Internet Archive: The Bacchae. Verse translation by Gilbert Murray. Multiple formats.

Internet Classics Archive: The Bacchantes. HTML and TXT formats.

Loebulus: L011N - Euripides -- Euripides III: Bacchanals. Madness of Hercules. Children of Hercules. Phoenician Maidens. Suppliants. Greek and English parallel text. Loeb edition, PDF format.

Perseus: Greek text and English translation by T.A. Buckley. HTML and XML formats.

Poetry in Translation: Bacchae, translated by George Theodoridis. Multiple formats.

University of Adelaide: The Bacchantes, translated by E.P. Coleridge. Multiple formats.

Wikisource: Greek text and English translation by Arthur Way. HTML and other formats.

Continue reading "Euripides: The Bacchae" »


Euripides: Orestes

Orestes (Greek: Ὀρέστης) is a tragedy by Euripides, first produced in Athens in 408 BC. Based on similar legendary material to Aeschylus' Oresteia, it recounts the flight of Orestes and Electra from the vengeance of the Furies after killing their mother Clytemnestra, the intervention of their uncle Menelaus, and the resolution of matters by the god Apollo.

Free online texts

Gutenberg: Ορέστης, Greek text. Multiple formats.

Gutenberg: The Tragedies of Euripides, Vol I, translated by Theodore Alois Buckley (1892). Multiple formats. 

Internet Archive:  The Plays of Euripides, v.II: Andromache, Electra, The Bacchantes, Hecuba, Heracles mad, The Phoenician Maidens, Orestes, Iphigenia among the Tauri, Iphigenia at Aulis, The Cyclops. English translation by E.P. Coleridge. Multiple formats.

Internet Classics Archive: Orestes, translated by E.P. Coleridge. HTML and TXT formats.

Loebulus: L010N - Euripides -- Euripides II: Electra. Orestes. Iphigeneia in Taurica. Andromache. Cyclops. Greek and English parallel text. Loeb edition, PDF format.

Perseus: Greek text with English translation by E.P. Coleridge. HTML and XML formats.

Poetry in Translation: Orestes, translated by George Theodoridis. Multiple formats.

University of Adelaide: Orestes, translated by E.P. Coleridge.

Wikisource: Greek text and English translation by Arthur Way. HTML and other formats.

Other Resources

Gutenberg: Euripides and His Age, by Gilbert Murray.

History of Ancient Greece: Euripides at War, podcast by Ryan Stitt.

Librivox: Orestes, public domain audiobook.

Wikipedia: Orestes (play)

The Great Conversation: Further reading at Tom's Learning Notes

Aeschylus: The Libation Bearers.

Aeschylus: The Eumenides.

Euripides: Electra.

Euripides: Andromache.

A.E. Haigh: The Tragic Drama of the Greeks (1896).

 Ancient Greek resources: Learn to read Greek classics in the original.

Bloom's Western Canon: Orestes is listed.


Euripides: The Phoenician Women

The Phoenician Women (Greek: Φοίνισσαι) by Euripides is the longest surviving Greek tragedy in existence. Originally produced sometime between 412 BC and 408 BC, its retelling of the legendary struggle for the city of Thebes through the eyes of chorus of innocent Phoenician bystanders may reflect conditions in Athens at the end of the Peloponnesian War. The plot covers similar material to Aeschylus' Seven Against Thebes and gives accounts of the fates of Oedipus and Antigone that differ from those in Sophocles' Theban Plays.

Free online texts

Gutenberg: The Tragedies of Euripides, Vol I, translated by Theodore Alois Buckley (1892). Multiple formats. 

Internet Archive: The Plays of Euripides, v.II: Andromache, Electra, The Bacchantes, Hecuba, Heracles Mad, The Phoenician Maidens, Orestes, Iphigenia among the Tauri, Iphigenia at Aulis, The Cyclops. English translation by E.P. Coleridge. Multiple formats.

Internet Classics Archive: The Phoenissae, translated by E.P. Coleridge. HTML and TXT formats.

Loebulus: L011N - Euripides -- Euripides III: Bacchanals. Madness of Hercules. Children of Hercules. Phoenician Maidens. Suppliants. Greek and English parallel text. Loeb edition, PDF format.

Perseus: Greek text and English translation by E.P. Coleridge. HTML and XML formats.

Poetry in Translation: Phoenician Women, translated by George Theodoridis. Multiple formats.

University of Adelaide: The Phoenissae, translated by E.P. Coleridge. Multiple formats.

Wikisource: The Phoenician Maidens, English translation by Arthur S. Way. HTML and other formats.

Other Resources

History of Ancient Greece: Euripides at War, podcast by Ryan Stitt.

Wikipedia: The Phoenician Women.

The Great Conversation: Further reading at Tom's Learning Notes

Aeschylus: Seven Against Thebes.

Sophocles: The Theban Plays.

A.E. Haigh: The Tragic Drama of the Greeks (1896).

 Ancient Greek resources: Learn to read Greek classics in the original.