Tacitus: The Histories
Tacitus: Dialogue on Orators

Tacitus: The Annals

The Death of Nero, by Vasily Smirnov (1888).The Annals are the final work of the great Roman historian Tacitus, covering the period from the death of Augustus in 14 AD to the death of Nero in 68 AD. Passages covering some 14 years of this 54 year period are lost. It is nevertheless the most important historical source covering this period, during which the principate, the autocratic regime established by Augustus, was consolidated by the later Julio-Claudian emperors. Tacitus understood that Rome's domination of the Mediterranean world was linked to the decay of its republican institutions, and his work is shot through with ambivalence about that development. 

The Annals at Amazon.com, .uk, .fr, .de, .ca.

Free Online Texts

 Internet Archive: The annals and history of Tacitus. A new and literal English version (Oxford: Talboys, 1839). Multiple formats.

Internet Classics Archive: The Annals, translated by Alfred John Church and William Jackson Brodribb. English HTML and TXT files.

Internet History Sourcebook: The Annals, translated by Alfred John Church and William Jackson Brodribb. English TXT file.

LacusCurtius: The Annals, The Histories. Loeb Edition, English HTML text.

Loebulus. L249 - Tacitus -- Histories II: 4-5. Annals 1-3. PDF of public domain Loeb edition in Latin and English.

Perseus: The Annals. English HTML text, translated by Alfred John Church and William Jackson Brodribb. Latin text, edited by Charles Dennis Fisher.

Wikisource: The Annals, translated by Alfred John Church and William Jackson Brodribb, 1876. Online, downloadable as PDF/MOBI/EPUB.

Other Resources

Dickinson College Commentaries: Tacitus - Annals.

Librivox: The Annals - Public Domain audiobooks.

Livius: Tacitus.

Wikipedia: Annals (Tacitus).

The Annals at Amazon.com, .uk, .fr, .de, .ca.

The Great conversation: further reading at Tom's Learning Notes.

Tacitus: The Histories - covers the period after the Annals, including the dramatic year of the four emperors.

Tacitus: The Agricola.

Tacitus: The Germania.

Suetonius: The Lives of the The Twelve Caesars - part of this work covers the same period as the Annals.

Cassius Dio: The Roman History.

Comments

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Martin Buuri Kaburia

This is a very exciting reading

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